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Tips From Popular Money-Saving Experts

We all want to save money. While it’s a struggle for many, there are lots of simple ways to sock a few — or more — extra bucks away each month. Take a cue from some of these money-saving experts to find out a few easy ways you can cut back on expenses and start saving for whatever it is life throws your way.

Cook your own meals - If you find yourself going out to eat a lot, it might be a good time to evaluate your cooking skills.

“Cooking for yourself can be fast and easy, as well as surprisingly cheap,” explains Maura Judkis, writer, editor and Web producer in Washington, D.C. “Try online recipe finders for meals that use what you already have in your fridge. Make enough for a few days, and then use the leftovers in sandwiches for work the rest of the week. Eating at your desk could save you more than $100 a month.”

Be specific about your goals - When you’re particular about where you want to be financially, it will be easier to actually reach those goals. For instance, determine where you’d like to be financially when it comes to having money set aside for putting your kids through college, your vacation fund or the account for emergencies.

“Your needs will take precedence over your wants, with short-term needs being the top priority,” says Kiplinger contributing editor Cameron Huddleston. “Then you can set goals to meet those needs — and fulfill your wants.”

Use coupons — on everything - “You already know to look for coupons when shopping for groceries, clothes, toys and home goods, but what about all those other items in your budget? A quick Internet search could help you save big bucks on everything from medicine to dental care to car repairs and pet care,” says Andrea Woroch, a nationally recognized consumer and money-saving expert, writer and TV personality. “Consider this example: I was picking up a prescription at CVS when I decided to search Google for any possible deals. Voila! I found a voucher that will end up saving me $480 on a 12-month supply!”

Utilize your own skills before hiring a professional - You might be more handy than you think.

“When it comes to home repairs, don’t be afraid to try to fix things yourself. Even if you aren’t the handy type, small jobs like fixing running toilets and patching drywall will cost you over a hundred dollars to hire a professional,” says Jefferson, site founder of See Debt Run. “You owe it to yourself and your wallet to try to find a step-by-step guide online, and at least give it a good try to do the work yourself.”

Remember that a little bit goes a long way - Putting aside money in crafty ways will help you save a little bit each month — and even a little bit can add up quickly.

“When you’re able to eliminate a major expense, put half the savings into your new account,” notes Mary Rowland, writer for “When you finish paying for your car, for instance, save one half of the car payment each month. Or suppose you save $75 a week on child-care expenses when your kids start school. Put $37.50 per week into a savings account. That will build up really quickly!”

Regardless of how you do it, start saving more and see how quickly your savings account starts growing. Find out how we can help you save money today.


Includes copyrighted material of IMakeNews, Inc. and its suppliers. All content contained in this newsletter is for informational purposes only and should not be relied upon to make any financial, accounting, tax, legal or other related decisions. Each person must consider his or her objectives, risk tolerances and level of comfort when making financial decisions and should consult a competent professional advisor prior to making any such decisions. Any opinions expressed through the content in this newsletter are the opinions of the particular author only.